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Food for Thought: GenoPalate January Newsletter

Industry Innovations


The world of nutrigenomics becomes more personalized and innovative every day. Learn some of the latest happenings in the field. 


Just Discovered


These recently published nutrigenomics studies reveal interesting information about how our genes affect the way we process food. Read on to learn more about the newest discoveries in nutrition.


For years we’ve known that plant-based foods are beneficial for our gut health, heart health, and weight management. Studies are now finding that incorporating more plant-based foods is also beneficial for our brain health. 


A recent study found that a higher intake of plant-based foods, including fruits and vegetables, provided polyphenols and other bioactive compounds that can potentially help to reduce the risk of cognitive decline due to aging. 


In addition to fruits and vegetables, the study found a protective association between metabolites derived from cocoa, coffee, mushrooms, and red wine.  

If you’re working on supporting your brain health as you age, consider incorporating more plant-based foods into your eating pattern, especially foods rich in polyphenols such as berries, apples, pomegranates, and cocoa. 


You can read more about the study here


Fast Fact: 


Did you know that dry January started in 2013 as a public health movement in the United Kingdom? What began as a personal experiment for Emily Robinson launched into a larger campaign that now has over 130,000 taking part in. Are you one of them?



You’ve Got Questions? We’ve Got Answers! 


Q: I have been hearing more about high-histamine foods. What are they and should I be avoiding them? 


A: To start, histamine is produced by the body when the body is exposed to an allergen. Histamines are responsible for those allergic reactions such as itchy rashes, hives, or watery eyes. Additionally, histamines are found in food, in fact, all foods contain some amount of histamines. Foods that are known to be higher in histamine are fermented foods such as kombucha and kimchi, aged cheeses, processed meats, and alcoholic beverages. 


Unless you are part of the small percentage of the population with histamine intolerance, you generally don’t need to worry about the histamines in your food. Histamine intolerance is dependent on genetics, medications, and health conditions. Since histamine intolerance is somewhat of an emerging condition, there is no way to test for it yet. Consult with your healthcare team if you suspect you have a histamine intolerance. 



Trends for Foodies


Discover the hottest trends in the food industry that affect the way we look at—and eat—food!


While climate change is not a new phenomenon, its severity is garnering traction. What more foodies are beginning to lean towards is reducing food waste as an actionable step to mitigating climate change. Even brands are catching on and using their reach to promote this effort. Companies are finding ways to incorporate foods that would have otherwise been wasted into their products. You can join in too by meal planning before each week to ensure you purchase the accurate amount of food in hopes to have less food waste at the end of the week! 



Fast Fact: 


A recent study found that there may be a genetic component that attributes an individual’s preference for black coffee and dark chocolate. However, rather than the taste, it’s the individuals’ genes that allow them to metabolize caffeine faster. Their interpretation is that these people simply equate the bitter taste with the mental alertness. For that reason, it becomes a learned effect and they subsequently prefer black coffee and dark chocolate. 


What’s Cooking?


Each month, we will be highlighting a few seasonal recipes. Happy cooking!


You might be burnt out of decadent meals and sweet treats by now. If so, here is a nutrient-dense recipe that still tastes delicious!


Servings: 6 

Serving size: 1 serving 

Calories: 345

Fat: 20g

Carbohydrates: 41g

Fiber: 7g

Protein: 6g


We’re guessing more than a few of you recently got an air fryer over the holidays! If so, here is an easy salmon recipe that you can make in the air fryer. Pair this recipe with a side of brown rice and veggies to complete the meal. 


Servings: 4

Serving size: 1

Calories: 276

Fat: 14

Carbohydrates: 1

Fiber: 1

Protein: 34



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